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  • Line managers toolkit - Managing staff with health conditions or disabilities

University Health, Safety & Environment Service

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Staff living with a health condition or disability may need adjustments to enable them to effectively perform their role at work.

The Equality Act 2010 enshrines this under the concept of making 'reasonable adjustments'

This includes making adjustments where necessary in the recruitment process, to ensure that disabled workers aren't discouraged or prevented from applying for a post, and throughout their employment.

Any adjustments you make for an individual should be periodically reviewed, to ensure that they remain appropriate.

This toolkit contains information on a number of conditions for which people may need adjustments to enable them to stay at work and perform their role effectively.

Back to Staying Safe and Well: Health and Wellbeing

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Health conditions and disabilities

 Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic-fibrosis-in-HE.pdf

Prospective employees who have cystic fibrosis would normally declare it on an Occupational Health form at the start of their employment. If any adjustments are needed, the Occupational Health provider would advise.

 Dyslexia

Dylexia is not always picked up during education as many people have developed a range of coping strategies that mask their dyslexia. Occasionally a problem surfaces only when an employee has unexpected or unexplained difficulties with some aspect of their work, for example short-term memory difficulties, organisational skills, or information processing difficulties.

GPs do not deal with dyslexia screening as they don’t have the funding to cover it, and it’s not available on the NHS. We recommend that any employee who thinks they may be dyslexic should initially do the British Dyslexia Association checklist which will flag up the likelihood that a person is dyslexic. This is a useful starting point for a more in-depth discussion with your department's HR Manager about what adjustments or assistance may be needed for the person. Access to Work may be able to provide assistance for employees with dyslexia.

Guidance: Making lectures and meetings more accessible

Some assistance with choosing Assistive Technology is available from Computing Services (use the HELP facility to access this).

Further information:  Dyslexia Action

 Mental Health
 Stammering

Understanding stammering - a guide for employers (produced by Employers Network for Equality and Inclusion in association with Employers Stammering Network)

Access to Work

Access to Work can provide grants to individuals that enable them to start work or to remain in work. The employee must make the application themselves. Your department's HR Business Partner can provide advice and support to you and the employee.

Access to Work fact sheet for employers

Expectant and new mothers

Although not considered a health condition as such, expectant and new mothers are included here because of the need to ensure that any necessary adjustments to their role are made effectively.

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